IMPROVE BLOOD CIRCULATION NOW!

Do you often find yourself a victim of chest pain, shortness of breath, or headaches? Are you perhaps considered at high risk for a heart attack? Follow these tips to improve your blood circulation throughout your body and lower your risk of a heart attack.
-Walk regularly. Going for walks after meals can help increase circulation and aid your digestive system in doing its job. Walking at least 30 minutes each day is recommended.
-Eat healthy foods and avoid unhealthy foods. Eat fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats (found in fish oil, olive oil, nuts and seeds). Stay away from overly processed foods, foods with excessive sugar or salt, and foods with unhealthy fats (saturated and trans fats)
-Drink right. Drink enough water during the day so that your organs don’t have to fight to produce energy and perform their daily functions. You don’t have to drink liters upon liters a day, but you should drink water when you’re thirsty. Try drinking some warm water, as cold water is known to close up your veins.
Cut out the caffeine. If you can’t live without it, at least minimize your intake. For instance, if you usually have two cups of coffee in the morning, have one instead. Or if you buy your coffee from a cafe somewhere, try switching to decaf or taking your coffee down one size.
Cut out alcohol and other sugary drinks from your diet. Sodas and overly sweet drinks do not improve your circulation, and have especially deleterious health effects.
-Try taking a hot bath or doing other heat treatments. Draw up a nice warm bath (with or without Epsom salts, which are healing mineral salts) and relax for 20 to 30 minutes. Fill up hot water bottles, cover if necessary to avoid burns, and place on extremities to boost blood flow.
-Find healthy outlets for your stress. Over time, stress can have negative effects on the body’s circulation. Find manageable, healthy ways to relieve stress, such as regular exercise, meditation techniques, and psychotherapy, among others.
-Know if it’s bad. Be able to spot when your body is having trouble pumping its blood. Signs that your circulation is less than ideal include:
Tingling in the feet and hands
Cold extremities (fingers and toes)
Bluish-tinted skin
Slow healing times for wounds






AM I HAVING A HEART ATTACK?

Your arteries carry blood, oxygen and nutrients to the heart and to the rest of the body. A heart attack occurs when an artery of the heart (also known as a “coronary artery”) is suddenly closed or blocked by a blood clot.
Although the closure happens suddenly, it often results from plaque that has built up in the arteries over time. This process is called atherosclerosis.
It is also known as hardening of the arteries. When the artery closes, the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart drops suddenly and sharply. This lack of oxygen causes damage to the heart.
Signs and symptoms
Most of the signs and symptoms of a heart attack are the same for both men and women. Someone having a heart attack may feel:
chest pain, which may also include feelings of:
-tightness
-discomfort
-crushing pain
-heaviness
-pressure
-squeezing
-fullness
-burning.

spreading pain, which may spread out:
-from the chest area
-down one or both arms
-to the neck, jaw or shoulders.

shortness of breath
paleness, sweating or overall weakness
nausea, vomiting and maybe indigestion
anxiety or fear.

If you notice any of these symptoms:
-Tell someone.
-Call 911
or your local emergency number to get help right away.






DANGERS OF SLEEP APNEA

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts. You may have sleep apnea if you snore loudly and you feel tired even after a full night’s sleep. Sleep apnea is considered a serious medical condition. Complications may include:
-High blood pressure or heart problems. Sudden drops in blood oxygen levels that occur during sleep apnea increase blood pressure and strain the cardiovascular system. If you have obstructive sleep apnea, your risk of high blood pressure (hypertension) is greater than if you don’t. The more severe your sleep apnea, the greater the risk of high blood pressure. However, obstructive sleep apnea increases the risk of stroke, regardless of whether or not you have high blood pressure.
-Daytime fatigue. The repeated awakenings associated with sleep apnea make normal, restorative sleep impossible. People with sleep apnea often experience severe daytime drowsiness, fatigue and irritability. You may have difficulty concentrating and find yourself falling asleep at work, while watching TV or even when driving. You may also feel irritable, moody or depressed.
-Complications with medications and surgery. Obstructive sleep apnea is also a concern with certain medications and general anesthesia. People with sleep apnea may be more likely to experience complications following major surgery because they’re prone to breathing problems, especially when sedated and lying on their backs.
-Liver problems. People with sleep apnea are more likely to have abnormal results on liver function tests, and their livers are more likely to show signs of scarring.
-Sleep-deprived partners. Loud snoring can keep those around you from getting good rest and eventually disrupt your relationships. It’s not uncommon for a partner to go to another room, or even on another floor of the house, to be able to sleep. Many bed partners of people who snore are sleep-deprived as well.
People with sleep apnea may also complain of memory problems, morning headaches, mood swings or feelings of depression, a need to urinate frequently at night (nocturia), and a decreased interest in sex. Children with untreated sleep apnea may be hyperactive and may be diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).






COOKING TO LOWER CHOLESTEROL

It’s not hard to whip up recipes that fit with the low saturated fat, low trans fat, low-cholesterol eating plan recommended by scientists to help you manage your blood cholesterol level and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. Discover how easy it is to avoid excess saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol while enjoying mouth-watering dishes.
The American Heart Association recommends eating no more than six ounces of cooked lean meat, poultry (skinless), fish or seafood a day for people who need 2,000 calories. Most meats have about the same amount of cholesterol, roughly 70 milligrams in each three-ounce cooked serving (about the size of a deck of cards). But the amount of saturated fat in meats can vary widely, depending on the cut and how it’s prepared. Here are some ways to reduce the saturated fat in meat:
There are some cooking tips listed below will help you prepare tasty, heart-healthy meals.
-Select lean cuts of meat with minimal visible fat. Lean beef cuts include the round, chuck, sirloin or loin. Lean pork cuts include the tenderloin or loin chop, while lean lamb cuts come from the leg, arm and loin.
-Buy “choice” or “select” grades rather than “prime.” Select lean or extra lean ground beef.
-Trim all visible fat from meat before cooking.
-Broil rather than pan-fry meats such as hamburger, lamb chops, pork chops and steak.
-Use a rack to drain off fat when broiling, roasting or baking. Instead of basting with drippings, keep meat moist with wine, fruit juices or an acceptable oil-based marinade.
-Cook a day ahead of time. Stews, boiled meat, soup stock or other dishes in which fat cooks into the liquid can be refrigerated. Then the hardened fat can be removed from the top.
-When a recipe calls for browning the meat first, try browning it under the broiler instead of in a pan.
-Eat chicken and turkey rather than duck and goose, which are higher in fat. Choose white meat most often when eating poultry.
-Remove the skin from chicken or turkey, before cooking. If your poultry dries out too much, first try basting with wine, fruit juices or an acceptable oil-based marinade and if that does not help, leave the skin on for cooking but remove before eating.
-Limit processed meats to none or no more than two servings per week. Examples of processed meats include sausage, bologna, salami and hot dogs. Many processed meats — even those with “reduced fat” labels — are high in calories and saturated fat. They are often high in sodium as well. Read labels carefully and choose such meats only now and then.
-Organ meats such as liver, sweetbreads, kidney and brain are very high in cholesterol. If you’re on a cholesterol-lowering diet, eat them only occasionally.






HOME REMEDIES FOR PARKINSON’S

If you’ve received a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, you’ll need to work closely with your doctor to find a treatment plan that offers you the greatest relief from symptoms with the fewest side effects. Certain lifestyle changes may also help make living with Parkinson’s disease easier.
-Healthy eating
Eat a nutritionally balanced diet that contains plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Eating foods high in fiber and drinking an adequate amount of fluids can help prevent constipation that is common in Parkinson’s disease.
A balanced diet also provides nutrients, such as omega-3 fatty acids, that may be beneficial for people with Parkinson’s disease.
-Exercise
Exercising may increase your muscle strength, flexibility and balance. Exercise can also improve your well-being and reduce depression or anxiety.
Your doctor may suggest you work with a physical therapist to learn an exercise program that works for you. You may also try exercises such as walking, swimming, dancing, water aerobics or stretching.
Parkinson’s disease can disturb your sense of balance, making it difficult to walk with a normal gait. Exercise may improve your balance. These suggestions may also help:
Try not to move too quickly.
Aim for your heel to strike the floor first when you’re walking.
If you notice yourself shuffling, stop and check your posture. It’s best to stand up straight.
Look in front of you, not directly down, while walking.
-Avoiding falls
In the later stages of the disease, you may fall more easily. In fact, you may be thrown off balance by just a small push or bump. The following suggestions may help:
Make a U-turn instead of pivoting your body over your feet.
Keep your center of gravity over your feet without leaning or reaching.
Avoid carrying things while you walk.
Avoid walking backward.
-Daily living activities
Daily living activities — such as dressing, eating, bathing and writing — can be difficult for people with Parkinson’s disease. An occupational therapist can show you techniques that make daily life easier.






DIAGNOSE ASTHMA WITH A BLOOD TEST?

While some symptoms of asthma, like wheezing, are obvious, a diagnosis of asthma is not always clear cut, especially if they don’t occur when patients are with their doctors, and involve trials of lung function and tests for allergies. But one new test could possibly diagnose asthma with a single drop of blood.
In the study, researchers found that neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, of asthmatics move more slowly than the cells of those without asthma. The scientists have created a micro-fluidic, handheld device that can test how quickly these neutrophils migrate toward the source of inflammation; these white blood cells move toward wounds in the body, for example, and help start the healing process. But neutrophils of asthmatics are sluggish. Sucks to your ass-mar, neutros.
Previously it was impractical to use neutrophils, as it required a fair amount of blood, according to a statement from the University of Wisconsin, from which some of the researchers hail. But the new device, which is made of cheap plastic, can detect the speed at which the white blood cells are moving, and then automatically come up with a diagnosis. “The device can sort neutrophils from a drop of whole blood within minutes, and was used in a clinical setting to characterize asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients,” the researchers wrote in the study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
If the device works, it could have wide application. The CDC says the number of Americans diagnosed with asthma increased by 4.3 million from 2001 to 2009, and the condition now affects more than 300 million people worldwide.






WHAT IS CALL ‘THE SILENT KILLER’?

One in every four adults — some 50 million people in the USA alone — have high blood pressure. But many people are unaware that they have the condition. Untreated hypertension increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. These are the first and third commonest causes of death in the USA. Hypertension can also damage the kidneys and increase the risk of blindness and dementia. That is why hypertension is referred to as a “silent killer.”
Everyone is at risk from high blood pressure. However, the elderly tend to have a different hypertension profile compared with younger people, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
It is important to raise our collective consciousness of a particular type of high blood pressure known as isolated systolic hypertension (ISH).
Systolic pressure is the first number in a blood pressure reading and is an indicator of blood pressure when the heart contracts. The second number, the diastolic pressure, reflects pressure when the heart relaxes between beats.
In the past, many doctors diagnosed high blood pressure based on diastolic pressure, the smaller number. However, new research suggests that systolic pressure is a much better indicator of hypertension, particularly in the elderly.
Diastolic pressure increases up to age 55 and then tends to decline, according to the NHLBI. On the other hand, systolic pressure continues to increase with age and is an important determinant of elevated blood pressure in middle-aged and older adults. While any pressure above 140/90 is considered elevated, about 65% of people with hypertension who are over age 60 have ISH.
High blood pressure interacts with other major risk factors such as diabetes and high levels of cholesterol to amplify the risk of heart attack and stroke.






RISK FACTORS FOR OBESITY

Obesity occurs when you eat and drink more calories than you burn through exercise and normal daily activities. Your body stores these extra calories as fat. Obesity usually results from a combination of causes and contributing factors, including:
Genetics. Your genes may affect the amount of body fat you store and where that fat is distributed. Genetics may also play a role in how efficiently your body converts food into energy and how your body burns calories during exercise. Even when someone has a genetic predisposition, environmental factors ultimately make you gain more weight.
Inactivity. If you’re not very active, you don’t burn as many calories. With a sedentary lifestyle, you can easily take in more calories every day than you burn off through exercise and normal daily activities.
Unhealthy diet and eating habits. Having a diet that’s high in calories, eating fast food, skipping breakfast, consuming high-calorie drinks and eating oversized portions all contribute to weight gain.
Family lifestyle. Obesity tends to run in families. That’s not just because of genetics. Family members tend to have similar eating, lifestyle and activity habits. If one or both of your parents are obese, your risk of being obese is increased.
Quitting smoking. Quitting smoking is often associated with weight gain. And for some, it can lead to a weight gain of as much as several pounds a week for several months, which can result in obesity. In the long run, however, quitting smoking is still a greater benefit to your health than continuing to smoke.
Pregnancy. During pregnancy a woman’s weight necessarily increases.
Lack of sleep. Not getting enough sleep at night can cause changes in hormones that increase your appetite.
Certain medications. Some medications can lead to weight gain if you don’t compensate through diet or activity. These medications include some antidepressants, anti-seizure medications, diabetes medications, antipsychotic medications, steroids and beta blockers.
Age. Obesity can occur at any age, even in young children. But as you age, hormonal changes and a less active lifestyle increase your risk of obesity.
Social and economic issues. Certain social and economic issues may be linked to obesity. You may not have safe areas to exercise, you may not have been taught healthy ways of cooking, or you may not have money to buy healthier foods. In addition, the people you spend time with may influence your weight — you’re more likely to become obese if you have obese friends or relatives.






CAN HORMONES MAKE YOU HAPPY?

The feelings we experience are nothing more than chemical reactions taking place inside our bodies. Each and every emotion we experience is a the result of the release of certain hormones inside our bodies. Some hormones are responsible for making us feel good, some are responsible for making us feel bad while some others are responsible for the feelings we get when we fall in love with someone.
The important question now is, can someone become happy if he alerted these hormones inside his body?
Yes that will certainly work however you must put in mind that unless you deal with the root cause of your problems your happiness won’t last for prolonged periods.
For example if you had a fight with your best friend then doing any of the actions that stimulate the release of happiness hormones might help you feel good for a short period of time but in the end your bad feelings will return.
So if the hormones won’t help you feel good for prolonged periods of time then why its still recommended that you learn how to tweak them?
Simply because they can help you ease your pain and feel better until you deal with your problems.
Hormones that make you happy-
-Serotonin: Serotonin is sometimes called the happiness hormone. Serotonin regulates the mood, prevents depression and makes you feel happy. Serotonin can be released by getting exposed to sunlight, by eating foods rich in carbohydrates and by exercising.
-Endorphins: Endorphins can make you feel good, reduce your anxiety and your sensitivity to pain. Endorphins are released by exercising
-Dopamine: Dopamine helps you to feel mentally alert. The lack of it might cause lack of attention, lack of concentration and bad moods. Dopamine can be released by eating foods that are rich in protein.
-Phenylethamine: Phenylethamine is the hormone that results in the feelings we get in the early stages of a relationship. Cocoa beans contain Phenylethamine. eating chocolate might be helpful too.
-Ghrelin: Gherlin is a hormone that reduces stress and can help you become more relaxed. Ghrelin is released when we become Hungary that’s why eating too much is not always a good idea. Just eat according to your body’s needs and never fill your stomach completely in order to maintain good Ghrelin levels






GO WALL- NUTS AND FEEEEED YOUR BRAIN!

Is there a connection between how a food looks and what it does for your body? I keep thinking about all of those “male enhancement” remedies made from phallic-looking foods (and in some cases, actual animal phalluses). Science has pretty much come down and said those things just don’t work. But in the case of the old adage of walnuts being brain food, well, whoever came up with that just may have been onto something.
It’s really kind of zany how much a walnut half looks like a brain (albeit a nutty, crunchy, delicious brain!). The human brain is made up of about 60% of what is called “structural fat” and needs high-quality fats like omega-3s to function properly by keeping the brain fluid and flexible. Walnuts are loaded with omega-3s, which make them the ultimate “brain food.”
Some studies have linked low consumption of omega-3s to depression and decreased cognitive function. So making walnuts part of your diet (in moderation, of course) could be a good way boost your spirits as well as your IQ.
We all need sleep to stay sane. Did you know that walnuts also seem to triple melatonin levels in the body? Melatonin is one of the body’s sleep regulating hormones, so if you’re tired of counting sheep at night, maybe a pre-bedtime snack of walnuts would help you get some shuteye.
Walnuts also contain manganese, copper, iron, phosphorous, magnesium, and calcium—all nutrients which are important to good health, and walnuts, like most nuts, can help lower cholesterol and improve heart health when eaten as part of a balanced diet.
Most of the walnuts we consume in our diets are in sweets or baked goods.