REBOOST YOUR BRAIN WITH SUPERFOODS!

There is a proven link between what we put into our mouths and how well we think and feel. Our mood, ability to learn and memory are all affected by the type of foods we eat. Our brains rely on a steady supply of essential nutrients from our diet, blood sugar and oxygen to function properly. Eating a well-balanced diet abundant in these nutrients helps improve memory and boost brain power and may also reduce the risk of age-related diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s.
The brain is made up of 70 per cent fat and requires essential fatty acids (omega-3s) from the food we eat to maintain healthy function and development. Omega-3 fats are primarily found in oily fish such as salmon, trout and mackerel, flaxseed oil and nuts and seeds.
Protein is another important nutrient essential for proper brain function. Good-quality, low-fat protein is needed to supply our brains with essential amino acids to make neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine (needed for good memory) and serotonin (involved in mood). Foods such as eggs, legumes, tofu, organic chicken and lean meat are good choices.
Antioxidants, which include vitamins C, A and beta-carotene, are important for boosting brain power and protecting brain cells against free radical damage. Fruits and vegetables, especially red- and orange-coloured varieties, are full of antioxidant goodness.
Complex carbohydrates found in wholegrain cereals and breads (oats, rye, brown rice, quinoa) are good sources of energy, fibre and B vitamins. These foods provide your brain with a slow and steady supply of energy-giving glucose, without causing a sharp spike in blood sugar levels.






BE ALERT OF CLAUDICATION!

Claudication is pain caused by too little blood flow during exercise. Sometimes called intermittent claudication, this condition generally affects the blood vessels in the legs, but claudication can affect the arms, too.
At first, you’ll probably notice the pain only when you’re exercising, but as claudication worsens, the pain may affect you even when you’re at rest.
Although it’s sometimes considered a disease, claudication is technically a symptom of a disease. Most often, claudication is a symptom of peripheral artery disease, a potentially serious, but treatable circulation problem.
Fortunately, with treatment, you may be able to maintain an active lifestyle without pain.
Claudication symptoms include:
-Pain when exercising. You may feel pain or discomfort in your feet, calves, thighs, hips or buttocks depending on where you might have artery narrowing or damage. Claudication can also occur in your arms.
-Intermittent pain. Your pain may come and go as you do less-strenuous activities.
-Pain when at rest. As your condition progresses, you may feel pain in your legs even when you’re sitting or lying down.
-Discolored skin or ulcerations. If blood flow is severely reduced, your toes or fingers may look bluish or feel cold to the touch. You may also develop sores on your lower legs, feet, toes, arms or fingers.
Other possible symptoms include:
An aching or burning feeling
-Weakness






I HAD A HEART ATTACK WITHOUT KNOW IT?

A silent heart attack is a heart attack that has few, if any, symptoms. You may have never had any symptoms to warn you that you’ve developed a heart problem, such as chest pain or shortness of breath. Some people later recall their silent heart attack was mistaken for indigestion, nausea, muscle pain, or a bad case of the flu.
The risk factors for having a silent heart attack are the same as having a heart attack with symptoms. The risk factors include:
-Smoking or chewing tobacco
-Family history of heart disease
-High cholesterol
-Diabetes
-Lack of exercise
-Being overweight

Having a silent heart attack puts you at a greater risk of having another heart attack, which could be fatal. Having another heart attack also increases your risk of complications, such as heart failure.
If you wonder if you’ve had a silent heart attack, talk to your doctor. A review of your symptoms, health history and a physical exam can help your doctor decide if more tests are necessary. The only way to tell if you’ve had a silent heart attack is to have additional tests, such as an electrocardiogram, echocardiogram or other imaging tests. These tests can reveal changes that signal you’ve had a heart attack.






WHY DO WE NEED A SLEEP STUDY?

Polysomnography monitors your sleep stages and cycles to identify if or when your sleep patterns are disrupted and why.
The normal process of falling asleep begins with a sleep stage called non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. During this stage, your brain waves, as recorded by electroencephalography (EEG), slow down considerably. Your eyes don’t move back and forth rapidly during NREM, in contrast to later stages of sleep. After an hour or two of NREM sleep, your brain activity picks up again, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep begins. Most dreaming occurs during REM sleep.

You normally go through four to six sleep cycles a night, cycling between NREM and REM sleep in about 90 minutes. Your REM stage usually lengthens with each cycle as the night progresses. Sleep disorders can disturb this sleep process. Polysomnography monitors your sleep stages and cycles to identify if or when your sleep patterns are disrupted.
Your doctor may recommend polysomnography if he or she suspects you have:
-Sleep apnea or another sleep-related breathing disorder — your breathing repeatedly stops and starts during sleep.
-Periodic limb movement disorder — you involuntarily flex and extend your legs while sleeping. This sleep disorder is sometimes associated with restless legs syndrome.
-Narcolepsy — you experience overwhelming daytime drowsiness and sudden attacks of sleep.
-REM sleep behavior disorder — you act out dreams as you sleep.
-Unusual behaviors during sleep — you do unusual activities during sleep, such as walking, moving around a lot or rhythmic movements.
Unexplained chronic insomnia — you consistently have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep.






THE TRUTH ABOUT CHOLESTEROL AND EGGS

Chicken eggs are high in cholesterol, and a diet high in cholesterol can contribute to high blood cholesterol levels. However, how much the cholesterol in your diet can increase your blood cholesterol varies from person to person. Although eating too many eggs can increase your cholesterol, eating four egg yolks or fewer on a weekly basis hasn’t been found to increase your risk of heart disease.
When deciding whether to include eggs in your diet, consider the recommended daily limits on cholesterol in your food:
-If you are healthy, it’s recommended that you limit your dietary cholesterol to less than 300 milligrams (mg) a day.
-If you have cardiovascular disease, diabetes or a high low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) blood cholesterol level, you should limit your dietary cholesterol to less than 200 mg a day.
One large egg has about 186 mg of cholesterol — all of which is found in the yolk. Therefore, if you eat an egg on a given day, it’s important to limit other sources of cholesterol for the rest of that day. Consider substituting servings of vegetables for servings of meat, or avoid high-fat dairy products for that day.
If you like eggs but don’t want the extra cholesterol, use only the egg whites. Egg whites contain no cholesterol. You may also use cholesterol-free egg substitutes, which are made with egg whites.






WHAT CAUSES PARKINSON’S DISEASE?

A substance called dopamine acts as a messenger between two brain areas – the substantia nigra and the corpus striatum – to produce smooth, controlled movements. Most of the movement-related symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are caused by a lack of dopamine due to the loss of dopamine-producing cells in the substantia nigra. When the amount of dopamine is too low, communication between the substantia nigra and corpus striatum becomes ineffective, and movement becomes impaired; the greater the loss of dopamine, the worse the movement-related symptoms. Other cells in the brain also degenerate to some degree and may contribute to non-movement related symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.
Although it is well known that lack of dopamine causes the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, it is not clear why the dopamine-producing brain cells deteriorate. Genetic and pathological studies have revealed that various dysfunctional cellular processes, inflammation, and stress can all contribute to cell damage. In addition, abnormal clumps called Lewy bodies, which contain the protein alpha-synuclein, are found in many brain cells of individuals with Parkinson’s disease. The function of these clumps in regards to Parkinson’s disease is not understood. In general, scientists suspect that dopamine loss is due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors.






CAN ASTHMA BE CURED?

Asthma is an eminently controllable illness. Indeed, for most sufferers, control is so effective that it amounts to a virtual cure. But asthma is not curable in the same way as, say, a bacterial pneumonia; it never entirely goes away. Also, no one cure would ever suffice. It is becoming increasingly clear that there many types of asthma–and they differ greatly in their presentation and genesis. For example, asthma that presents as a chronic cough, the “cough variant of asthma,” appears to be very different from the life-threatening variety, which results in extreme respiratory failure and sometimes death.
Nevertheless, the sine qua non of asthma–as we understand it today–is the increased sensitivity of the airways to many different agents. These agents include respiratory viruses (common cold virus), pollutants (ozone and cigarette smoke), airborne allergens (animal dander, pollens and molds) and exercise, especially in a cold and dry environment. These agents, called triggers, induce an inflammatory reaction in the airways that, in turn, results in the common symptoms of cough, wheezing, increased mucus production and shortness of breath. Successful control of asthma entails controlling the inflammation in the airways and reversing the symptoms before they get out of hand.
The greatest advances in controlling asthma may be the change in physicians’ attitudes toward using preventive medications, as well as attempts to make home rescue plans more aggressive and self-sufficient. The availability of selective and potent medications has made such changes possible. By avoiding known triggers in the environment, such as cigarette smoke, dust mites, roach antigens and dander from warm-blooded pets like cats and dogs, patients can help minimize airway inflammation. Also, newer, tighter and more energy-efficient homes, forced-air heating and wall-to-wall carpeting all contribute to higher levels of indoor triggers.






SYMPTOMS OF “THE SILENT KILLER”

One in every three adults in the United States suffers from a condition that may lead to coronary heart disease or stroke, according to the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. High blood pressure, or hypertension, means the force of blood hitting against the walls of the arteries is high enough to cause damage. For an adult, the systolic BP should stay under 120. The bottom number, or diastolic, remains less than 80. Anything above those numbers is an indicator of potential risk.
-The Silent Killer
Hypertension is often referred to as “the silent killer” because it is often present with no obvious symptoms. When blood pressure rises, your symptoms may be negotiable. To monitor BP, medical professionals automatically take a reading with every visit. You should have your blood pressure taken at least once every two years.
-Prehypertension
The early stage of the condition is when you are most likely to show some signs of a problem. The medical community defines prehypertension as a systolic rate of 120 – 139 and a diastolic in the range of 80 – 89. Possible symptoms include:
-Mild, dull headache
-Dizzy spells
-Nosebleed
-Hypertension

When the blood pressure reaches the level that you are hypertensive, symptoms will disappear. A person is hypertensive when the systolic BP goes above 140 and the diastolic is over 90. Hypertension has two stages. Once the blood pressure exceeds 160/100, you are in stage 2. Neither stage produces symptoms.
Video: Stroke







-Hypertensive Crisis
Hypertensive crisis means there is a sudden spike in the blood pressure taking it over 180/120. Symptoms of a hypertensive crisis include:
-Chest pain
-Severe headache
-Confusion
-Blurred vision
-Nausea
-Vomiting
-Anxiety
-Shortness of breath
-Seizures

The person having the crisis may become unresponsive over time. Hypertensive crisis is a medical emergency.

SERIOUS COMPLICATIONS OF OBESITY

If you’re obese, you’re more likely to develop a number of potentially serious health problems, including:
-High cholesterol and triglycerides
Type 2 diabetes
-High blood pressure

-Metabolic syndrome — a combination of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high triglycerides and high cholesterol
-Heart disease
-Stroke
-Cancer
, including cancer of the uterus, cervix, ovaries, breast, colon, rectum and prostate
-Sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts
-Depression
-Gallbladder disease
-Gynecologic problems, such as infertility and irregular periods
-Erectile dysfunction and sexual health issues, due to deposits of fat blocking or narrowing the arteries to the genitals
-Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat builds up in the liver and can cause inflammation or scarring
-Osteoarthritis
-Skin problems, such as poor wound healing






IS ADULT ACNE CAUSE BY HORMONES?

Hormones likely play a role in the development of adult acne, but hormones generally aren’t the root cause of acne.
It’s true that some people with hormonal imbalances due to diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome experience more problems with acne. However, the vast majority of those with adult acne have no measurable hormonal imbalance.

A number of so-called natural acne treatments promise to “equalize” hormonal imbalances to reduce adult acne breakouts. But “natural hormones” are often derived from plants. Their chemical structure is different from hormones produced in the body, so their effectiveness may be limited. And because hormonal imbalance isn’t thought to play a major role in acne anyway, the premise behind such products is shaky at best.
Also, while the Food and Drug Administration has increased the regulations regarding quality and purity of dietary supplements, they’re still subject to far less oversight when it comes to efficacy and safety.
Adult acne can be a distressing and frustrating problem. Successful treatment of severe adult acne may take months or even years. But the good news is that effective treatments are available. If you’re concerned about adult acne, consult a dermatologist to learn more about safe, proven treatments. Also, check with your doctor before taking any dietary supplements, especially if you have any underlying health conditions.
Video: ANS