Lifestyle choices can protect your Brain

Researchers across the world are racing towards a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. But as prevalence rates climb, their focus has broadened from treatment to prevention strategies. What they’ve discovered is that it may be possible to prevent or delay the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia’s through a combination of healthful habits. While Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 50 percent of dementia cases, vascular dementia accounts for up to 40 percent in older adults, and there is much you can do to prevent this type of dementia.
It’s never too early to start boosting your brain reserves, but whatever your age, there are steps you can take to keep your brain healthy.
The health of your brain, like the health of your body, depends on many factors.
While some factors, such as your genes, are out of your control, many powerful lifestyle factors are within your sphere of influence.
The six pillars of a brain-healthy lifestyle are:
-Regular exercise
-Healthy diet
-Mental stimulation
-Quality sleep
-Stress management
-An active social life






Scientists believe lasers could help cure Alzheimer’s

Lasers could prove to be the key in eliminating brain diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. New findings from researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the Polish Wroclaw University of Technology have raised hopes that doctors may one day be able to cure the ailments without needing to touch surrounding brain tissue. Such a technique could also replace the chemical-based treatments used to treat amyloid protein aggregates today, which involve toxic components that can put patients at risk. The researchers discovered that it was possible to distinguish aggregations of the proteins thought to cause brain disease with the help of multi-photon lasers.
“We have found a totally new way of discovering these structures using just laser light” says Piotr Hanczyc of Chalmers University of Technology. “Nobody has talked about using only light to treat these diseases until now.” Singling out the harmful proteins is one crucial step, but they also need to be removed before patients can be cured of these life-altering diseases. To that end, the researchers seem hopeful that photo-acoustic therapy could be used to get rid of the protein aggregates.






Cinnamon may help prevent Alzheimer’s

An extract found in cinnamon bark, called CEppt, may be key to Alzheimer’s disease prevention, researchers at Tel Aviv University suggest.
Michael Ovadia says he was inspired to investigate the healing properties of cinnamon by a passage in the Bible. High priests used the spice in a holy ointment, presumably meant to protect them from infectious diseases and after discovering cinnamon extract had anti-viral properties.
Ovadia, Aviad Levin and colleagues isolated CEppt by grinding cinnamon and extracting the substance into an aqueous buffer solution. They fed the solution to genetically engineered mice and fruit flies.
The study, published in the journal PLoS ONE, found that after four months, the researchers determined the development of Alzheimer’s disease slowed remarkably and the animals’ activity levels and longevity were comparable to that of their healthy counterparts.






Cure for Alzheimer’s closer

A treatment to reverse Alzheimer’s Disease could be available in five years, it has been revealed. Experiments on mice have indicated that a new vaccine not only halts the advance of the disease, but repairs damage already done.
It could also be given to patients whose families have a history of Alzheimer’s, to prevent them developing the disease.
The research by British, American and Canadian scientists, was being hailed last night as the most significant breakthrough yet. Harry Cayton, chief executive of the Alzheimer’s Society, said: ‘This really does make us optimistic.’
A growing number of elderly and even middle-aged people are being struck down by the degenerative brain disease, which has some 500,000 sufferers in Britain alone. It causes untold misery to families who are left to care for loved ones who may no longer recognize them.
The vaccine attacks the build-up of a protein called beta-amyloid, which forms a damaging waxy plaque on brain cells. The latest research, reported today in the scientific journal Nature, suggests the drug not only removes the proteins but can restore mental functions.