TAKE CARE OF YOUR HYPERTENSION!

High blood pressure is a common condition in which the force of the blood against your artery walls is high enough that it may eventually cause health problems, such as heart disease.
Blood pressure is determined by the amount of blood your heart pumps and the amount of resistance to blood flow in your arteries. The more blood your heart pumps and the narrower your arteries, the higher your blood pressure.
-You can have high blood pressure (hypertension) for years without any symptoms. Even without symptoms, damage to blood vessels and your heart continues and can be detected. Uncontrolled high blood pressure increases your risk of serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke.
High blood pressure generally develops over many years, and it affects nearly everyone eventually. Fortunately, high blood pressure can be easily detected. And once you know you have high blood pressure, you can work with your doctor to control it.
The excessive pressure on your artery walls caused by high blood pressure can damage your blood vessels, as well as organs in your body. The higher your blood pressure and the longer it goes uncontrolled, the greater the damage.
Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to:
-Heart attack or stroke. High blood pressure can cause hardening and thickening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack, stroke or other complications.
-Aneurysm. Increased blood pressure can cause your blood vessels to weaken and bulge, forming an aneurysm. If an aneurysm ruptures, it can be life-threatening.
-Heart failure. To pump blood against the higher pressure in your vessels, your heart muscle thickens. Eventually, the thickened muscle may have a hard time pumping enough blood to meet your body’s needs, which can lead to heart failure.
-Weakened and narrowed blood vessels in your kidneys. This can prevent these organs from functioning normally.
-Thickened, narrowed or torn blood vessels in the eyes. This can result in vision loss.
-Metabolic syndrome. This syndrome is a cluster of disorders of your body’s metabolism, including increased waist circumference; high triglycerides; low high-density lipoprotein (HDL); or “good,” cholesterol; high blood pressure; and high insulin levels.
-If you have high blood pressure, you’re more likely to have other components of metabolic syndrome. The more components you have, the greater your risk of developing diabetes, heart disease or stroke.
-Trouble with memory or understanding. Uncontrolled high blood pressure may also affect your ability to think, remember and learn. Trouble with memory or understanding concepts is more common in people with high blood pressure.






AM I HAVING A HEART ATTACK?

Your arteries carry blood, oxygen and nutrients to the heart and to the rest of the body. A heart attack occurs when an artery of the heart (also known as a “coronary artery”) is suddenly closed or blocked by a blood clot.
Although the closure happens suddenly, it often results from plaque that has built up in the arteries over time. This process is called atherosclerosis.
It is also known as hardening of the arteries. When the artery closes, the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart drops suddenly and sharply. This lack of oxygen causes damage to the heart.
Signs and symptoms
Most of the signs and symptoms of a heart attack are the same for both men and women. Someone having a heart attack may feel:
chest pain, which may also include feelings of:
-tightness
-discomfort
-crushing pain
-heaviness
-pressure
-squeezing
-fullness
-burning.

spreading pain, which may spread out:
-from the chest area
-down one or both arms
-to the neck, jaw or shoulders.

shortness of breath
paleness, sweating or overall weakness
nausea, vomiting and maybe indigestion
anxiety or fear.

If you notice any of these symptoms:
-Tell someone.
-Call 911
or your local emergency number to get help right away.






NEW DISCOVERY TO REDUCE CHOLESTEROL

Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally. And one of the major culprits involved — in arteriosclerosis, for example — is cholesterol. There is therefore a considerable need for an effective method of treatment against increased cholesterol. Now, Danish researchers have made a discovery that may change how it is treated.
The researchers have identified a new so-called receptor system, located in all the cells in the body. The receptor, which is called sortilin, has a decisive influence on the protein PCSK9, which is of great importance for the body’s ability to deal with the harmful LDL cholesterol.
New strategy for cholesterol treatment
Ten years ago it was discovered that the level of LDL cholesterol fell if you inhibited PCSK9. PCSK9-inhibiting drugs have since become the new hope within cholesterol treatment and the first products will probably be approved this year. The discovery is one of the biggest biomedical success stories in recent times, as it is normally takes 20 years before basic research can be converted into a product. The high pace and great focus on the effect has, however, meant that only a few people have conducted research into how the body itself regulates PCSK9.
Possible alternative to statins
The positive effect of inhibiting sortilin has been demonstrated in mice and studies in humans suggest that the same correlation is present here. The next step is now larger studies on humans. The hope is that the discovery can be used to develop medicine that can act as an alternative to statins, which are the most widely used cholesterol-reducing medication. Particularly because not everyone can either tolerate or benefit from statins.






ANIMAL PROTEIN MAY BENEFIT OLDER MEN

A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicates diets high in animal protein may help the elderly function at higher levels physically, psychologically, and socially.
Life expectancy has increased in many countries, with more elderly citizens experiencing ability decline. Research has suggested people’s ability to absorb or process protein lessens with age, prompting Megumi Tsubota-Utsugi, PhD, MPH, RD, of the National Institute of Health and Nutrition in Japan, and her colleagues in Tohoku University and Teikyo University, Japan to examine if protein intake affects functional capabilities in older adults.
The resulting study analyzed this relationship and featured 1,007 individuals with an average age of 67.4. Participants completed food questionnaires at the study’s onset and seven years later. Intake of plant, animal and “total” protein was recorded.
Men who consumed the highest amount of animal protein intake had a 39 percent decreased chance of experiencing decline compared to those whose intake was lowest. This difference wasn’t seen in women. No link between plant protein intake and functional decline was apparent in the men or the women.






What are Statins?

Statins are a class of medicines that are frequently used to lower blood cholesterol levels. The drugs are able to block the action of a chemical in the liver that is necessary for making cholesterol.
Although cholesterol is necessary for normal cell and body function, very high levels of it can lead to atherosclerosis, a condition where cholesterol-containing plaques build up in arteries and block blood flow.
By reducing blood cholesterol levels, statins lower the risk of chest pain (angina), heart attack, and stroke.
Several types of statins exist such as atorvastatin, cerivastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, mevastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin. Atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are the most potent, while fluvastatin is the least potent. These medicines are sold under several different brand names including Lipitor (an atorvastatin), Pravachol (a pravastatin), Crestor (a rosuvastatin), Zocor (a simvastatin), Lescol (a fluvastatin) and Vytorin (a combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe). Mevastatin is a naturally occurring statin that is found in red yeast rice.