FOODS TO BOOST BLOOD CIRCULATION!

Good blood flow is essential for proper brain function and oxygen transport to vital organs in the body. Because your heart is the pump that keeps your blood circulating, it’s important to maintain a strong heart. Eating a diet rich in heart-healthy foods is one way to help ensure that your body experiences efficient blood flow.
Foods Containing L-Arginine
L-arginine is an amino acid that your body converts to nitric oxide, a substance that helps relax and maintain the elasticity of blood vessels and arteries. Nitric oxide is also a signaling molecule that instructs arteries to dilate, or widen, which allows blood to flow more freely, helping reduce blood pressure and promoting cardiovascular health. Good food sources of L-arginine include chicken, fish, soy nuts, beans, dairy and red meat. If you have high blood pressure, talk with your doctor before taking L-arginine supplements to ensure proper dosage for your condition.
Vitamin E-Rich Foods
Vitamin E, a fat-soluble vitamin, plays an important role in efficient blood flow because it dilates blood vessels. Eating foods rich in vitamin E is a good way to keep your blood moving. Good food sources of vitamin E include nuts, seeds, whole grains and leafy green vegetables. If you’re taking blood thinners, talk with your doctor before taking vitamin E supplements because they may increase the risk of bleeding
Foods Containing Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Omega-3 fatty acids keep your blood flowing. People with blood-circulation problems such as varicose veins, for example, benefit by eating foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids because these unsaturated fatty acids stimulate blood flow and help break down fibrin, or blood clots. Good food sources of omega-3 fatty acids include nuts, olive oil, canola oil, flax seeds and oily fish such as salmon, tuna, sardines and herring.






Aspirin for Peripheral Artery Disease

Aspirin helps prevent the formation of blood clots. This can decrease the chance that a blood clot will form and block an already-narrowed artery.
Brand-name aspirin is no more effective than generic or store brands.

Why It Is Used. Aspirin may be given to people who have peripheral arterial disease (PAD). It may also be used after bypass surgery or angioplasty to prevent the formation of blood clots after these procedures.
How Well It Works. Aspirin may lower the risk for heart attack and stroke in people who have peripheral arterial disease.
Aspirin is usually advised. A daily low dose (75 mg) is usual. This does not help with symptoms of PAD, but helps to prevent blood clots (thromboses) forming in arteries. It does this by reducing the stickiness of platelets in the bloodstream.
Here are some important things to think about side effects:
-Usually the benefits of the medicine are more important than any minor side effects.
-Side effects may go away after you take the medicine for a while.
-If side effects still bother you and you wonder if you should keep taking the medicine, call your doctor. He or she may be able to lower your dose or change your medicine. Do not suddenly quit taking your medicine unless your doctor tells you to.






5 Supertips to Clean Arteries and Veins!

Clogged arteries may lead to atherosclerosis, buildup of fats in and on your artery walls (plaques), which can restrict blood flow. If these plaques burst, you can get blood clots in your veins. To reduce the accumulation of plaque in your arteries and veins we invite you to follow the next tips:
1-Stop smoking immediately and get exercise most days of the week. Smoking damages your blood vessels and makes it harder for you to exercise. Exercise will help your blood circulation and help your body develop new blood vessels, thereby reducing the pressure on your already clogged vessels until these unclog. Engage in muscle-strengthening exercises such as push-ups, squats and sit-ups, in addition to cardiovascular exercise such as jogging, biking, walking, stair climbing and swimming.
2-Eat a healthy diet. Avoid hydrogenated fats, processed meals and bars, salty and sugary foods and all white-flour baked goods. Fruit, vegetables, water, nuts, whole-grain products and lean meats and fish should be the main staples of your diet. Cherries, strawberries, garlic, spinach, wild salmon, olive oil, green tea and sweet potatoes will help unclog your arteries naturally.
3-Lose weight and maintain your weight. If you’re overweight, losing as few as 5 to 10 pounds can help reduce your risk of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, two of the major risk factors for developing atherosclerosis.
4-Ask your doctor about drugs to help unclog your arteries. Medications lowering bad cholesterol–low-density lipoprotein — and boasting the good kind–high-density lipoprotein–are available, in addition to anti-platelet medications, which will reduce your chances of developing blood clots in your veins.
5-Consider surgery if your arteries remain clogged. Choices include angioplasty, bypass surgery, thrombolytic therapy and endarterectomy.






Factors and Conditions for Blood Clots

Blood clots that arise from within the carotid arteries in your neck may travel to the brain and cause a stroke.
Factors and conditions that can cause blood clots, as well as serious conditions that are associated with blood clots once they form and travel to other parts of your body, include:
Arteriosclerosis / atherosclerosis
Certain medications, such as oral contraceptives, hormone therapy drugs and some breast cancer medications
Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)
Factor V Leiden
Heart arrhythmias
Heart attack
Heart failure
Obesity
Peripheral artery disease (PAD)
Pregnancy
Prolonged sitting or bed rest
Pulmonary embolism
Smoking
Stroke
Surgery…