1 IN 7 STROKES HAPPENS WHILE SLEEPING

One in seven strokes happens at night, and sufferers may not get medicine that could prevent brain damage, suggests a new study.
“These kinds of strokes are common — about 15% of all strokes. That’s a substantial amount of people,” says study author Jason Mackey, a stroke researcher at the University of Cincinnati.
Mackey says “wake-up” stroke sufferers are more likely to miss out on a potentially life-saving clot-busting medication called tissue plasminogen activator, or TPA, that can only be given within the first few hours after stroke symptoms begin. Given beyond that window, it could cause complications.
For the study, researchers analyzed data from 1,854 patients over 18 who had been treated in hospital emergency departments in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky over the course of a year for ischemic strokes. These are caused by clots in the arteries of the brain that block blood flow, and are the most common type of stroke.
Mackey and his colleagues found that 273 patients experienced wake-up strokes. When translated to the greater population, that figure suggests approximately 58,000 people a year, he says.
Even though it’s difficult to know when a wake-up stroke first occurred, getting speedy medical care is critical. “The most important thing is if you suspect you’re having a stroke, call 911,” he says.






Symptoms of a Stroke

Watch for these signs and symptoms if you think you or someone else may be having a stroke. Note when your signs and symptoms begin, because the length of time they have been present may guide your treatment decisions.
-Trouble with walking. You may stumble or experience sudden dizziness, loss of balance or loss of coordination.
-Trouble with speaking and understanding. You may experience confusion. You may slur your words or have difficulty understanding speech.
-Paralysis or numbness of the face, arm or leg. You may develop sudden numbness, weakness or paralysis in your face, arm or leg, especially on one side of your body. Try to raise both your arms over your head at the same time. If one arm begins to fall, you may be having a stroke. Similarly, one side of your mouth may droop when you try to smile.
-Trouble with seeing in one or both eyes. You may suddenly have blurred or blackened vision in one or both eyes, or you may see double.
-Headache. A sudden, severe headache, which may be accompanied by vomiting, dizziness or altered consciousness, may indicate you’re having a stroke.
When to see a doctor- Seek immediate medical attention if you notice any signs or symptoms of a stroke, even if they seem to fluctuate or disappear. Call 911 or your local emergency number right away. Every minute counts. Don’t wait to see if symptoms go away. The longer a stroke goes untreated, the greater the potential for brain damage and disability. To maximize the effectiveness of evaluation and treatment, you’ll need to be treated at a hospital within three hours after your first symptoms appeared. If you’re with someone you suspect is having a stroke, watch the person carefully while waiting for emergency assistance.






Pop Songs could help Memory Damaged

Study suggests that music might help people who have trouble remembering the past.
You know those popular songs that you just can’t get out of your head? A new study suggests they have the power to trigger strong memories, many years later, in people with brain damage.
The small study suggests that songs instill themselves deeply into the mind and may help reach people who have trouble remembering the past.
It’s not clear whether the study results will lead to improved treatments for patients with brain damage. But they do offer new insight into how people process and remember music.
“This is the first study to show that music can bring to mind personal memories in people with severe brain injuries
in the same way that it does in healthy people,” said study lead author Amee Baird, a clinical neuropsychologist. “This means that music may be useful to use as a memory aid for people who have difficulty remembering personal memories from their past after brain injury.”
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