TREATMENTS FOR ANXIETY

The two main treatments for anxiety disorders are psychotherapy and medications. You may benefit most from a combination of the two. It may take some trial and error to discover which treatments work best for you.
Psychotherapy
Also known as talk therapy or psychological counseling, psychotherapy involves working with a therapist to reduce your anxiety symptoms. It can be an effective treatment for anxiety.
Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the most effective forms of psychotherapy for anxiety disorders. Generally a short-term treatment, cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on teaching you specific skills to gradually return to the activities you’ve avoided because of anxiety. Through this process, your symptoms improve as you build upon your initial success.
Medications
Several types of medications are used to treat anxiety disorders, including those below. Talk with your doctor about benefits, risks and possible side effects.
-Antidepressants. These medications influence the activity of brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) thought to play a role in anxiety disorders. Examples of antidepressants used to treat anxiety disorders include fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), imipramine (Tofranil), paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva), sertraline (Zoloft) and venlafaxine (Effexor XR). Citalopram (Celexa) and escitalopram (Lexapro) also can be effective, but dosages of 40 milligrams (mg) a day of citalopram or 20 mg a day of escitalopram warrant discussion of risks versus benefits. Your doctor also may recommend other antidepressants.
-Buspirone. An anti-anxiety medication called buspirone may be used on an ongoing basis. As with most antidepressants, it typically takes up to several weeks to become fully effective.
-Benzodiazepines. In limited circumstances, your doctor may prescribe one of these sedatives for relief of anxiety symptoms. Examples include alprazolam (Niravam, Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), and lorazepam (Ativan). Benzodiazepines are generally used only for relieving acute anxiety on a short-term basis. Because they can be habit-forming, these medications aren’t a good choice if you’ve had problems with alcohol or drug abuse.
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Video: Ultrasound Test






PERILS OF DEPRESSION AND PAIN

Pain and depression are closely related. Depression can cause pain — and pain can cause depression. Sometimes pain and depression create a vicious cycle in which pain worsens symptoms of depression, and then the resulting depression worsens feelings of pain.
In many people, depression causes unexplained physical symptoms such as back pain or headaches. This kind of pain may be the first or the only sign of depression.
Pain and the problems it causes can wear you down over time, and may begin to affect your mood. Chronic pain causes a number of problems that can lead to depression, such as trouble sleeping and stress. Disabling pain can cause low self-esteem due to work, legal or financial issues. Depression doesn’t just occur with pain resulting from an injury. It’s also common in people who have pain linked to a health condition such as diabetes or migraines.
To get symptoms of pain and depression under control, you may need separate treatment for each condition. However, some treatments may help with both:
-Antidepressant medications may relieve both pain and depression because of shared chemical messengers in the brain.
-Talk therapy, also called psychological counseling (psychotherapy), can be effective in treating both conditions.
-Stress-reduction techniques, physical activity, exercise, meditation, journaling and other strategies also may help.
-Pain rehabilitation programs provide a team approach to treatment, including medical and psychiatric aspects.
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Video: Stress Test






DANGERS OF A PANIC ATTACK!

A panic attack is a sudden episode of intense fear that triggers severe physical reactions when there is no real danger or apparent cause. Panic attacks can be very frightening. When panic attacks occur, you might think you’re losing control, having a heart attack or even dying.
Left untreated, panic attacks and panic disorder can result in severe complications that affect almost every area of your life. You may be so afraid of having more panic attacks that you live in a constant state of fear, ruining your quality of life.
Complications that panic attacks may cause or be linked to include:
Development of specific phobias, such as fear of driving or leaving your home
-Avoidance of social situations
-Problems at work or school
-Depression
-Increased risk of suicide
or suicidal thoughts
Alcohol or substance abuse
-Financial problems

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Video: Ultrasound Test:






MORBID OBESITY DANGERS!

Obesity occurs when you eat and drink more calories than you burn through exercise and normal daily activities. Your body stores these extra calories as fat. If you’re obese, you’re more likely to develop a number of potentially serious health problems, including:
-High cholesterol and triglycerides
-Type 2 diabetes
-High blood pressure

-Metabolic syndrome — a combination of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high triglycerides and high cholesterol
-Heart disease
-Stroke
-Cancer
, including cancer of the uterus, cervix, ovaries, breast, colon, rectum and prostate
-Sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts
-Depression
-Gallbladder disease

-Gynecologic problems, such as infertility and irregular periods
-Erectile dysfunction and sexual health issues, due to deposits of fat blocking or narrowing the arteries to the genitals.
-Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat builds up in the liver and can cause inflammation or scarring
-Osteoarthritis
-Skin problems, such as poor wound healing






SERIOUS COMPLICATIONS OF OBESITY

If you’re obese, you’re more likely to develop a number of potentially serious health problems, including:
-High cholesterol and triglycerides
Type 2 diabetes
-High blood pressure

-Metabolic syndrome — a combination of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high triglycerides and high cholesterol
-Heart disease
-Stroke
-Cancer
, including cancer of the uterus, cervix, ovaries, breast, colon, rectum and prostate
-Sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts
-Depression
-Gallbladder disease
-Gynecologic problems, such as infertility and irregular periods
-Erectile dysfunction and sexual health issues, due to deposits of fat blocking or narrowing the arteries to the genitals
-Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat builds up in the liver and can cause inflammation or scarring
-Osteoarthritis
-Skin problems, such as poor wound healing






DANGERS OF SLEEP APNEA

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts. You may have sleep apnea if you snore loudly and you feel tired even after a full night’s sleep. Sleep apnea is considered a serious medical condition. Complications may include:
-High blood pressure or heart problems. Sudden drops in blood oxygen levels that occur during sleep apnea increase blood pressure and strain the cardiovascular system. If you have obstructive sleep apnea, your risk of high blood pressure (hypertension) is greater than if you don’t. The more severe your sleep apnea, the greater the risk of high blood pressure. However, obstructive sleep apnea increases the risk of stroke, regardless of whether or not you have high blood pressure.
-Daytime fatigue. The repeated awakenings associated with sleep apnea make normal, restorative sleep impossible. People with sleep apnea often experience severe daytime drowsiness, fatigue and irritability. You may have difficulty concentrating and find yourself falling asleep at work, while watching TV or even when driving. You may also feel irritable, moody or depressed.
-Complications with medications and surgery. Obstructive sleep apnea is also a concern with certain medications and general anesthesia. People with sleep apnea may be more likely to experience complications following major surgery because they’re prone to breathing problems, especially when sedated and lying on their backs.
-Liver problems. People with sleep apnea are more likely to have abnormal results on liver function tests, and their livers are more likely to show signs of scarring.
-Sleep-deprived partners. Loud snoring can keep those around you from getting good rest and eventually disrupt your relationships. It’s not uncommon for a partner to go to another room, or even on another floor of the house, to be able to sleep. Many bed partners of people who snore are sleep-deprived as well.
People with sleep apnea may also complain of memory problems, morning headaches, mood swings or feelings of depression, a need to urinate frequently at night (nocturia), and a decreased interest in sex. Children with untreated sleep apnea may be hyperactive and may be diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).






WHAT’S MORBID OBESITY?

The term morbid obesity refers to patients who are 50 – 100% — or 100 pounds above — their ideal body weight. Alternatively, a BMI (body mass index) value greater than 39 may be used to diagnose morbid obesity.
Medical problems commonly resulting from untreated morbid obesity include the following:
-Diabetes
-Hypertension
-Heart disease
-Stroke
-Certain cancers
, including breast and colon
-Depression
-Osteoarthritis

Affected people may gradually develop hypoxemia (decreased blood oxygen saturation) and have problems with sleep apnea (periodic cessation of breathing while asleep).
Decreased blood oxygen and problems associated with sleep apnea may result in feeling drowsy through the day (somnolence), high blood pressure, and pulmonary hypertension. In extreme cases, especially when medical treatment is not sought, this can lead to right-sided heart failure (cor pulmonale), and ultimately death.






PERILS OF OBESITY

If you’re obese, you’re more likely to develop a number of potentially serious health problems, including:
-High cholesterol and triglycerides
-Type 2 diabetes
-High blood pressure

-Metabolic syndrome — a combination of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high triglycerides and high cholesterol
-Heart disease
-Stroke
-Cancer
, including cancer of the uterus, cervix, ovaries, breast, colon, rectum and prostate
-Sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts
-Depression
-Gallbladder disease
-Gynecologic problems
, such as infertility and irregular periods
-Erectile dysfunction and sexual health issues, due to deposits of fat blocking or narrowing the arteries to the genitals
-Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat builds up in the liver and can cause inflammation or scarring
-Osteoarthritis
-Skin problems, such as poor wound healing
Quality of life- When you’re obese, your overall quality of life may be lower, too. You may not be able to do things you’d normally enjoy as easily as you’d like. You may have trouble participating in family activities. You may avoid public places. You may even encounter discrimination.
Other weight-related issues that may affect your quality of life include:
-Depression
-Disability
-Physical discomfort
-Sexual problems
-Shame
-Social isolation






COMPLICATIONS OF OBESITY

Obesity occurs when you eat and drink more calories than you burn through exercise and normal daily activities. Your body stores these extra calories as fat.
If you’re obese, you’re more likely to develop a number of potentially serious health problems, including:
-High cholesterol and triglycerides
-Type 2 diabetes
-High blood pressure
-Metabolic syndrome — a combination of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high triglycerides and high cholesterol
-Heart disease
-Stroke
-Cancer, including cancer of the uterus, cervix, ovaries, breast, colon, rectum and prostate
-Sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts
-Depression
-Gallbladder disease
-Gynecologic problems, such as infertility and irregular periods
Erectile dysfunction and sexual health issues, due to deposits of fat blocking or narrowing the arteries to the genitals
-Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat builds up in the liver and can cause inflammation or scarring
-Osteoarthritis
-Skin problems, such as poor wound healing.
When you’re obese, your overall quality of life may be lower, too. You may not be able to do things you’d normally enjoy as easily as you’d like. You may have trouble participating in family activities. You may avoid public places. You may even encounter discrimination.






Depression and Erectile Dysfunction

It is not uncommon for men with ED to feel angry, frustrated, sad, or even unsure of them self. Such feelings, if not dealt with, can eventually lead to depression.
Depression that accompanies ED is treatable. The first step in overcoming depression is to be honest with yourself, your partner, and your doctor. After depression has been brought out into the open, coping with it will be easier and less stressful.
Recognizing Depression- Depression is an illness marked by persistent sadness, feelings of hopelessness, and a pessimistic outlook.
The most common symptoms of depression include:
-Low self-esteem
-Loss of interest in formerly pleasurable activities
-Fatigue
-Changes in appetite
-Sleep disturbances
-Apathy

Depression affects the way one feels about oneself and the way one thinks about life. People who are depressed cannot simply “pull themselves together” and get better. Without treatment, symptoms of depression can last indefinitely. Appropriate treatment, however, can help most people who suffer from depression get back on track.