CAUSES OF ANXIETY AND PANIC ATTACKS!

As with many mental health conditions, the exact cause of anxiety disorders isn’t fully understood. Life experiences such as traumatic events appear to trigger anxiety disorders in people who are already prone to becoming anxious. Inherited traits also can be a factor.
Medical causes
For some people, anxiety is linked to an underlying health issue. In some cases, anxiety signs and symptoms are the first indicators of a medical illness. If your doctor suspects your anxiety may have a medical cause, he or she may order lab tests and other tests to look for signs of a problem.
Examples of medical problems that can be linked to anxiety include:
-Heart disease
-Diabetes
-Thyroid problems
, such as hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism
Asthma
-Drug abuse
or withdrawal
Withdrawal from alcohol, anti-anxiety medications (benzodiazepines) or other medications
-Irritable bowel syndrome
-Rare tumors that produce certain “fight-or-flight” hormones
-Premenstrual syndrome
Sometimes anxiety can be a side effect of certain medications.
It’s more likely that your anxiety may be due to an underlying medical condition if:
-You don’t have any blood relatives (such as a parent or sibling) with an anxiety disorder
-You didn’t have an anxiety disorder as a child
You don’t avoid certain things or situations because of anxiety
-You have a sudden occurrence of anxiety that seems unrelated to life events and you didn’t have a previous history of anxiety
Video: ANS






MORBID OBESITY DANGERS!

Obesity occurs when you eat and drink more calories than you burn through exercise and normal daily activities. Your body stores these extra calories as fat. If you’re obese, you’re more likely to develop a number of potentially serious health problems, including:
-High cholesterol and triglycerides
-Type 2 diabetes
-High blood pressure

-Metabolic syndrome — a combination of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high triglycerides and high cholesterol
-Heart disease
-Stroke
-Cancer
, including cancer of the uterus, cervix, ovaries, breast, colon, rectum and prostate
-Sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts
-Depression
-Gallbladder disease

-Gynecologic problems, such as infertility and irregular periods
-Erectile dysfunction and sexual health issues, due to deposits of fat blocking or narrowing the arteries to the genitals.
-Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat builds up in the liver and can cause inflammation or scarring
-Osteoarthritis
-Skin problems, such as poor wound healing






EGGS DO NOT CAUSE HEART DISEASE!

Nutrition professionals have an excellent track record of demonizing healthy foods.
Red meat, cheese, coconut oil… to name a few. But the #1 worst example is their decades of propaganda against eggs, which are among the healthiest foods on the planet.

Eggs do NOT Cause Heart Disease
Historically, eggs have been considered unhealthy because they contain cholesterol.
A large egg contains 212mg of cholesterol, which is a lot compared to most other foods.
However, it has been proven, time and time again, that eggs and dietary cholesterol do NOT adversely affect cholesterol levels in the blood.
In fact, eggs raise HDL (the good) cholesterol. They also change LDL cholesterol from small, dense LDL (which is bad) to large LDL, which is benign.
A new meta-analysis published in 2013 looked at 17 prospective studies on egg consumption and health. They discovered that eggs had no association with either heart disease or stroke in otherwise healthy people.
This isn’t new data. Multiple older studies have led to the same conclusion.
Bottom Line: Despite the fear mongering of the past few decades, eating eggs and cholesterol has no association whatsoever with heart disease.






OBESITY TREATMENT

Obesity is defined as having an excessive amount of body fat. Obesity is more than just a cosmetic concern, though. It increases your risk of diseases and health problems such as heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.
The goal of obesity treatment is to reach and stay at a healthy weight. You may need to work with a team of health professionals, including a nutritionist, dietitian, therapist or an obesity specialist, to help you understand and make changes in your eating and activity habits.
You can start feeling better and seeing improvements in your health by just introducing better eating and activity habits. The initial goal is a modest weight loss — 5 to 10 percent of your total weight. That means that if you weigh 200 pounds (91 kg) and are obese by BMI standards, you would need to lose only about 10 to 20 pounds (4.5 to 9.1 kg) to start seeing benefits.
All weight-loss programs require changes in your eating habits and increased physical activity. The treatment methods that are right for you depend on your level of obesity, your overall health and your willingness to participate in your weight-loss plan. Other treatment tools include:
Dietary changes
-Exercise and activity
Behavior change
-Prescription weight-loss medications
-Weight-loss surgery






FACTS ABOUT “THE SILENT KILLERS”

“Silent killer disease” are diseases that produces minimum or no symptoms and are capable of causing death if not treated.
-Heart disease, hypertension, stroke and diabetes are major silent killer diseases.
There are other lesser known silent diseases that include primary amyloidosis, Renal cell cancer , pancreatic cancer, Hepatitis B or C infection to name a few.
-Heart disease is the number one silent killer disease. The main risk factors that contribute to this increased risk include – Hypertension, smoking, sedentary lifestyle and raised cholesterol.
-Cancer as group is the next big silent killer and comes a close second. Estimated deaths in a year due to cancer is 6.2 million. 1 in 8 death occurs due to cancer and it outnumbers death due to AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria combined.
-Smoking is an important risk factor for silent killer disease like cancers and heart disease. Smoking causes 87% of lung cancers.
-Mesothelioma another silent killer is almost always due to inhalation of asbestos fibers and at present there is no known cure for this very lethal cancer.
-There are 246 million people with diabetes in the world and every year it is estimated that 3.2 million people die due to the diabetes or its related causes.
-Obstructive Sleep apnea is a risk factor for stroke and sudden death during sleep. The increase in obesity has also increased its risk and incidence.
-Silent epidemic that is potentially a threat to the health of the world include liver infection from Hepatitis B and C viruses. It can cause cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. Both these viruses have infected almost 530 million people in the world. Every year there are 3 to 4 million people who are newly infected by the viruses. There is no cure or vaccine for chronic hepatitis C infection.






COOKING TO LOWER CHOLESTEROL

It’s not hard to whip up recipes that fit with the low saturated fat, low trans fat, low-cholesterol eating plan recommended by scientists to help you manage your blood cholesterol level and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. Discover how easy it is to avoid excess saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol while enjoying mouth-watering dishes.
The American Heart Association recommends eating no more than six ounces of cooked lean meat, poultry (skinless), fish or seafood a day for people who need 2,000 calories. Most meats have about the same amount of cholesterol, roughly 70 milligrams in each three-ounce cooked serving (about the size of a deck of cards). But the amount of saturated fat in meats can vary widely, depending on the cut and how it’s prepared. Here are some ways to reduce the saturated fat in meat:
There are some cooking tips listed below will help you prepare tasty, heart-healthy meals.
-Select lean cuts of meat with minimal visible fat. Lean beef cuts include the round, chuck, sirloin or loin. Lean pork cuts include the tenderloin or loin chop, while lean lamb cuts come from the leg, arm and loin.
Buy “choice” or “select” grades rather than “prime.” Select lean or extra lean ground beef.
-Trim all visible fat from meat before cooking.
-Broil rather than pan-fry meats such as hamburger, lamb chops, pork chops and steak.
-Use a rack to drain off fat when broiling, roasting or baking. Instead of basting with drippings, keep meat moist with wine, fruit juices or an acceptable oil-based marinade.
-Cook a day ahead of time. Stews, boiled meat, soup stock or other dishes in which fat cooks into the liquid can be refrigerated. Then the hardened fat can be removed from the top.
-When a recipe calls for browning the meat first, try browning it under the broiler instead of in a pan.
-Eat chicken and turkey rather than duck and goose, which are higher in fat. Choose white meat most often when eating poultry.
-Remove the skin from chicken or turkey, before cooking. If your poultry dries out too much, first try basting with wine, fruit juices or an acceptable oil-based marinade and if that does not help, leave the skin on for cooking but remove before eating.
-Limit processed meats to none or no more than two servings per week. Examples of processed meats include sausage, bologna, salami and hot dogs. Many processed meats — even those with “reduced fat” labels — are high in calories and saturated fat. They are often high in sodium as well. Read labels carefully and choose such meats only now and then.
-Organ meats such as liver, sweetbreads, kidney and brain are very high in cholesterol. If you’re on a cholesterol-lowering diet, eat them only occasionally.






WHAT IS CALL ‘THE SILENT KILLER’?

One in every four adults — some 50 million people in the USA alone — have high blood pressure. But many people are unaware that they have the condition. Untreated hypertension increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. These are the first and third commonest causes of death in the USA. Hypertension can also damage the kidneys and increase the risk of blindness and dementia. That is why hypertension is referred to as a “silent killer.”
Everyone is at risk from high blood pressure. However, the elderly tend to have a different hypertension profile compared with younger people, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
It is important to raise our collective consciousness of a particular type of high blood pressure known as isolated systolic hypertension (ISH).
Systolic pressure is the first number in a blood pressure reading and is an indicator of blood pressure when the heart contracts. The second number, the diastolic pressure, reflects pressure when the heart relaxes between beats.
In the past, many doctors diagnosed high blood pressure based on diastolic pressure, the smaller number. However, new research suggests that systolic pressure is a much better indicator of hypertension, particularly in the elderly.
Diastolic pressure increases up to age 55 and then tends to decline, according to the NHLBI. On the other hand, systolic pressure continues to increase with age and is an important determinant of elevated blood pressure in middle-aged and older adults. While any pressure above 140/90 is considered elevated, about 65% of people with hypertension who are over age 60 have ISH.
High blood pressure interacts with other major risk factors such as diabetes and high levels of cholesterol to amplify the risk of heart attack and stroke.






PHYSICAL CAUSES OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Male sexual arousal is a complex process that involves the brain, hormones, emotions, nerves, muscles and blood vessels. Erectile dysfunction can result from a problem with any of these. Likewise, stress and mental health problems can cause or worsen erectile dysfunction. Sometimes a combination of physical and psychological issues causes erectile dysfunction. For instance, a minor physical problem that slows your sexual response may cause anxiety about maintaining an erection. The resulting anxiety can lead to or worsen erectile dysfunction.
Physical causes of erectile dysfunction
In most cases, erectile dysfunction is caused by something physical. Common causes include:
-Heart disease
-Clogged blood vessels
(atherosclerosis)
-High cholesterol
-High blood pressure
-Diabetes
-Obesity
-Metabolic syndrome
, a condition involving increased blood pressure, high insulin levels, body fat around the waist and high cholesterol
-Parkinson’s disease
-Multiple sclerosis
-Low testosterone
-Peyronie’s disease
, development of scar tissue inside the penis
-Certain prescription medications
-Tobacco use
-Alcoholism
and other forms of substance abuse
-Treatments for prostate cancer or enlarged prostate
-Surgeries or injuries that affect the pelvic area or spinal cord






PERILS OF OBESITY

If you’re obese, you’re more likely to develop a number of potentially serious health problems, including:
-High cholesterol and triglycerides
-Type 2 diabetes
-High blood pressure

-Metabolic syndrome — a combination of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high triglycerides and high cholesterol
-Heart disease
-Stroke
-Cancer
, including cancer of the uterus, cervix, ovaries, breast, colon, rectum and prostate
-Sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts
-Depression
-Gallbladder disease
-Gynecologic problems
, such as infertility and irregular periods
-Erectile dysfunction and sexual health issues, due to deposits of fat blocking or narrowing the arteries to the genitals
-Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat builds up in the liver and can cause inflammation or scarring
-Osteoarthritis
-Skin problems, such as poor wound healing
Quality of life- When you’re obese, your overall quality of life may be lower, too. You may not be able to do things you’d normally enjoy as easily as you’d like. You may have trouble participating in family activities. You may avoid public places. You may even encounter discrimination.
Other weight-related issues that may affect your quality of life include:
-Depression
-Disability
-Physical discomfort
-Sexual problems
-Shame
-Social isolation






CAN YOU DIE FROM SLEEP APNEA?

Sleep apnea is a very serious of a condition and could be fatal. It’s not just about constantly feeling tired or snoring – both things people think they can just ignore and deal with. When you have sleep apnea, you stop breathing when you sleep. Depending on how severe your sleep apnea is, you could stop breathing hundreds of times a night. This disrupts your sleep cycle and prevents you from entering the deep stages of sleep where your body repairs itself.
When your body can’t repair itself, your risk for other life-threatening conditions like stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and others is increased. It can also make you a drowsy driver, putting you at an increased risk for causing an accident and hurting yourself and others.
Sudden cardiac death can also be a consequence of untreated sleep apnea. This could be because those with sleep apnea experience events called nocturnal ischemias, which happen at night while you sleep when your heart doesn’t get enough blood. These events tend to happen when the coronary arteries that supply blood to your heart become blocked or narrowed. Often the heart can get enough blood through these constricted arteries while you are sleeping, but it cannot cope under stressful events like the continued lack of oxygen you experience throughout the night when you suffer from sleep apnea.
Treating sleep apnea could help reduce the risk for these life-threatening conditions, so talk to your doctor about any concerns you are having. Never dismiss feelings of constant fatigue as something you have to deal with by drinking an extra cup of coffee or your snoring as an annoyance your bed partner will learn to live with. Your body is trying to tell you something, so make an appointment to speak with your doctor.