FUTURE TREATMENTS FOR IMPOTENCE

Future treatments for erectile dysfunction focus on providing medications that are more effective, work rapidly, and have fewer, if any, side effects than currently available treatments. Currently there are five oral drugs available to treat ED — Cialis, Levitra, Stendra, Staxyn, and Viagra. A number of pharmaceutical companies are researching new treatments for ED, and many new options may be just around the corner. These include:
-Uprima: Uprima (apomorphine) comes in a tablet form that dissolves under the tongue. Uprima works by stimulating the brain chemical dopamine, which heightens sexual interest and sensations. Its major side effects are nausea and vomiting. Additionally, a small number of people passed out after taking Uprima. Therefore, its release in the U.S. is on hold. It is currently available in Europe. Clinical trials are also currently being conducted on a nasal spray form of this drug, which may cause less nausea.
-Topiglan: Still under investigation, a cream applied to the penis called topiglan uses the same drug (alprostadil) that is used in injection therapy and suppository therapy. If topiglan proves to be safe and effective, it is still not entirely clear which patients would benefit from its application and whether patients on injection and suppository therapy would no longer have to use these techniques.
-Melanocortin activators: These are drugs that appear to act through the central nervous system (for example, the brain). They have been shown in animal studies to produce an erection. Initial studies in humans suggest that the drug (PT-141) can be effective if given intranasally (through the nose) in men with mental rather than physical causes of ED and mild to moderate ED. Larger studies will be necessary to demonstrate the safety and overall effectiveness of these drugs.







-Gene therapy: This novel therapy would deliver genes that produce products or proteins that may not be functioning properly in the penile tissue of men with ED. Replacement of these proteins may result in improvement in erectile function. Experimental animal models have demonstrated improvement in erectile function with gene therapy. Human studies may also demonstrate success with this therapy. Gene therapy may take a long time for regulatory approval and public acceptance.

NEW ED DRUG MAY WORK IN 15 MINUTES!

Look out Viagra – there’s a new erectile dysfunction drug in town.
It’s called Stendra (aka Avanafil) and it’s newly approved by the Food and Drug Administration, making it the first ED drug to come out in almost 10 years.

Although Stendra has not been tested against what is known as the “Little Blue Pill,” drug makers say that – for some men – it may work faster.
“If things are heated up, theoretically you can get improved function earlier, within 15 minutes, with this drug,” said Dr. Irwin Goldstein, director of sexual medicine at Alvarado Hospital in San Diego, and co-author of a recent study about Stendra in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.
“You can argue this is the first potential on-demand drug.”
The “on-demand” drug could end up in high demand for men with ED who do not respond to drugs like Viagra, Cialis and Levitra.






Best Medications for Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (ED), formerly called impotence, can affect men of all ages, although it is much more common among older men. It is normal for men to occasionally experience erectile dysfunction. However, if the problem becomes chronic, it can have adverse effects on relationships, emotional health, and self-esteem. Erectile dysfunction may also be a symptom of an underlying health condition. If erectile dysfunction becomes an on-going problem, it is important to talk to your doctor.
PDE5 inhibitors are generally the first choice of treatment for erectile dysfunction. There are three brands that are approved for the treatment of erectile dysfunction:
-Sildenafil (Viagra)
-Vardenafil (Levitra)
-Tadalafil (Cialis)

These drugs are generally safe and effective for most men. These medications may not be appropriate for men with certain health conditions, such as severe heart disease, heart failure, history of stroke, or uncontrolled high blood pressure or diabetes. Men who take nitrate drugs cannot use PDE5 inhibitors, and these drugs can also interact with other medications. Talk to your doctor about whether PDE5 inhibitor drugs are a safe choice for you.






Do’s and Don’ts if you having Potency Problems?

Impotence is usually treatable these days. However, it’s important to first establish what the cause is. Very often, there are several causes, including both physical and psychological factors.
Commonsense measures will often help – for instance, cutting down on overwork, stress, alcohol or smoking, getting more sleep or stopping any medications which interfere with erection.
If you have difficulty getting an erection, seek help. Don’t suffer in silence – as so many men do!
Also, don’t hide it from your partner. A lot of guys behave like this, and very often the result is that the other person decides that she is being scorned, or that ‘he doesn’t love me any more’.
Your first move should be to consult your GP.
If for any reason you don’t want to do that, then contact another medical/relationships agency, such as the ones listed at the end of this article.
Please don’t do foolish things like:
-buying yourself some pills or potion off the Internet
-signing up with some clinic that asks you for $1,000 deposit
-going to a prostitute to see if she can cure you
-deciding that your life is over (it isn’t).






Common Treatments for Erectile Dysfunction

Standard treatments for ED include lifestyle changes, such as exercising, losing weight, stopping smoking, or curbing alcohol intake. Medications like Viagra, Cialis, or Levitra increase blood flow to the penis, but can cause nasal congestion, headache, upset stomach, and vision changes. Men who have experienced a stroke, have uncontrolled diabetes, or suffer low blood pressure should not take ED medications.

-Testosterone replacement and erection-inducing injections are also available, but side effects may include acne, breast enlargement, increased urination, aching in the penis, and scarring.
-Non-drug treatments for ED include penis pumps, penile implants, and blood vessel surgery. A pump is used right before intercourse to pull blood into the penis. However, this method can cause bruising. Implants must be surgically inserted into the penis, but then can be inflated when necessary. Risks include those typically associated with surgery, such as infections.
-Blood vessel surgery is recommended only when leaking vessels cause ED. Even though all these methods may help some men, natural alternatives can be just as effective, but less invasive.