REBOOST YOUR BRAIN WITH SUPERFOODS!

There is a proven link between what we put into our mouths and how well we think and feel. Our mood, ability to learn and memory are all affected by the type of foods we eat. Our brains rely on a steady supply of essential nutrients from our diet, blood sugar and oxygen to function properly. Eating a well-balanced diet abundant in these nutrients helps improve memory and boost brain power and may also reduce the risk of age-related diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s.
The brain is made up of 70 per cent fat and requires essential fatty acids (omega-3s) from the food we eat to maintain healthy function and development. Omega-3 fats are primarily found in oily fish such as salmon, trout and mackerel, flaxseed oil and nuts and seeds.
Protein is another important nutrient essential for proper brain function. Good-quality, low-fat protein is needed to supply our brains with essential amino acids to make neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine (needed for good memory) and serotonin (involved in mood). Foods such as eggs, legumes, tofu, organic chicken and lean meat are good choices.
Antioxidants, which include vitamins C, A and beta-carotene, are important for boosting brain power and protecting brain cells against free radical damage. Fruits and vegetables, especially red- and orange-coloured varieties, are full of antioxidant goodness.
Complex carbohydrates found in wholegrain cereals and breads (oats, rye, brown rice, quinoa) are good sources of energy, fibre and B vitamins. These foods provide your brain with a slow and steady supply of energy-giving glucose, without causing a sharp spike in blood sugar levels.






GO WALL- NUTS AND FEEEEED YOUR BRAIN!

Is there a connection between how a food looks and what it does for your body? I keep thinking about all of those “male enhancement” remedies made from phallic-looking foods (and in some cases, actual animal phalluses). Science has pretty much come down and said those things just don’t work. But in the case of the old adage of walnuts being brain food, well, whoever came up with that just may have been onto something.
It’s really kind of zany how much a walnut half looks like a brain (albeit a nutty, crunchy, delicious brain!). The human brain is made up of about 60% of what is called “structural fat” and needs high-quality fats like omega-3s to function properly by keeping the brain fluid and flexible. Walnuts are loaded with omega-3s, which make them the ultimate “brain food.”
Some studies have linked low consumption of omega-3s to depression and decreased cognitive function. So making walnuts part of your diet (in moderation, of course) could be a good way boost your spirits as well as your IQ.
We all need sleep to stay sane. Did you know that walnuts also seem to triple melatonin levels in the body? Melatonin is one of the body’s sleep regulating hormones, so if you’re tired of counting sheep at night, maybe a pre-bedtime snack of walnuts would help you get some shuteye.
Walnuts also contain manganese, copper, iron, phosphorous, magnesium, and calcium—all nutrients which are important to good health, and walnuts, like most nuts, can help lower cholesterol and improve heart health when eaten as part of a balanced diet.
Most of the walnuts we consume in our diets are in sweets or baked goods.