CAUSES OF ANXIETY AND PANIC ATTACKS!

As with many mental health conditions, the exact cause of anxiety disorders isn’t fully understood. Life experiences such as traumatic events appear to trigger anxiety disorders in people who are already prone to becoming anxious. Inherited traits also can be a factor.
Medical causes
For some people, anxiety is linked to an underlying health issue. In some cases, anxiety signs and symptoms are the first indicators of a medical illness. If your doctor suspects your anxiety may have a medical cause, he or she may order lab tests and other tests to look for signs of a problem.
Examples of medical problems that can be linked to anxiety include:
-Heart disease
-Diabetes
-Thyroid problems
, such as hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism
Asthma
-Drug abuse
or withdrawal
Withdrawal from alcohol, anti-anxiety medications (benzodiazepines) or other medications
-Irritable bowel syndrome
-Rare tumors that produce certain “fight-or-flight” hormones
-Premenstrual syndrome
Sometimes anxiety can be a side effect of certain medications.
It’s more likely that your anxiety may be due to an underlying medical condition if:
-You don’t have any blood relatives (such as a parent or sibling) with an anxiety disorder
-You didn’t have an anxiety disorder as a child
You don’t avoid certain things or situations because of anxiety
-You have a sudden occurrence of anxiety that seems unrelated to life events and you didn’t have a previous history of anxiety
Video: ANS






HYPERTENSION: WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR?

You’ll likely have your blood pressure taken as part of a routine doctor’s appointment.
Ask your doctor for a blood pressure reading at least every two years starting at age 18. Blood pressure should be checked in both arms to determine if there is a difference. Your doctor will likely recommend more frequent readings if you’ve already been diagnosed with high blood pressure or other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Children age 3 and older will usually have their blood pressure measured as a part of their yearly checkups.

If you don’t regularly see your doctor, you may be able to get a free blood pressure screening at a health resource fair or other locations in your community. You can also find machines in some stores that will measure your blood pressure for free, but these machines can give you inaccurate results.There are two types of high blood pressure.
Primary (essential) hypertension
For most adults, there’s no identifiable cause of high blood pressure. This type of high blood pressure, called essential hypertension or primary hypertension, tends to develop gradually over many years.
Secondary hypertension
Some people have high blood pressure caused by an underlying condition. This type of high blood pressure, called secondary hypertension, tends to appear suddenly and cause higher blood pressure than does primary hypertension. Various conditions and medications can lead to secondary hypertension, including:
Kidney problems
Adrenal gland tumors
Thyroid problems

Certain defects in blood vessels you’re born with (congenital)
Certain medications, such as birth control pills, cold remedies, decongestants, over-the-counter pain relievers and some prescription drugs
Illegal drugs, such as cocaine and amphetamines
Alcohol abuse or chronic alcohol use
Obstructive sleep apnea