WARNINGS OF STROKE!

Warning signs are clues your body sends that your brain is not receiving enough oxygen. If you observe one or more of these signs of a stroke or “brain attack,” don’t wait, call a doctor or 911 right away!
-Sudden numbness or weakness of face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body
-Sudden confusion, or trouble talking or understanding speech
-Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
-Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance or coordination
-Sudden severe headache with no known cause
Other danger signs that may occur include double vision, drowsiness, and nausea or vomiting. Sometimes the warning signs may last only a few moments and then disappear. These brief episodes, known as transient ischemic attacks or TIAs, are sometimes called “mini-strokes.” Although brief, they identify an underlying serious condition that isn’t going away without medical help. Unfortunately, since they clear up, many people ignore them. Don’t. Paying attention to them can save your life.






BE AWARE VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION!

Ventricular fibrillation is a heart rhythm problem that occurs when the heart beats with rapid, erratic electrical impulses. This causes pumping chambers in your heart (the ventricles) to quiver uselessly, instead of pumping blood. During ventricular fibrillation, your blood pressure plummets, cutting off blood supply to your vital organs. Ventricular fibrillation is frequently triggered by a heart attack.
Ventricular fibrillation is an emergency that requires immediate medical attention. A person with ventricular fibrillation will collapse within seconds and soon won’t be breathing or have a pulse. Emergency treatment for ventricular fibrillation includes cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and shocks to the heart with a device called a defibrillator.
Treatments for those at risk of ventricular fibrillation include medications and implantable devices that can restore a normal heart rhythm.
Loss of consciousness or fainting is the most common sign of ventricular fibrillation.
Early ventricular fibrillation symptoms
It’s possible that you may have other signs and symptoms that start about an hour before your heart goes into ventricular fibrillation and you faint. These include:
Chest pain
-Rapid heartbeat (tachycardia)
-Dizziness
-Nausea
-Shortness of breath






BE AMARE OF DIZZINESS AND VERTIGO!

Dizziness is a term used to describe everything from feeling faint or lightheaded to feeling weak or unsteady. Dizziness that creates the sense that you or your surroundings are spinning or moving is called vertigo.
Dizziness can usually be more specifically described as one of the following sensations:
-The false sense of motion or spinning (vertigo)
-Lightheadedness or the feeling of near fainting
-Loss of balance or unsteadiness (disequilibrium)
-Other sensations such as floating, swimming or heavy-headedness
A number of underlying health conditions can cause these problems. Some of these conditions disrupt or confuse the signals your brain receives from one or more of your sensory systems, including your:
-Eyes, which help you determine where your body is in space and how it’s moving
-Sensory nerves, which send messages to your brain about body movements and positions
-Inner ear, which houses sensors that help detect gravity and back-and-forth motion
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Video: Nerve Conduction Study






MYTHS OF HYPERTENSION SYMPTOMS

There’s a common misconception that people with high blood pressure, also called hypertension, will experience symptoms such as nervousness, sweating, difficulty sleeping or facial flushing. The truth is that HBP is largely a symptomless condition. If you ignore your blood pressure because you think symptoms will alert you to the problem, you are taking a dangerous chance with your life. Everybody needs to know their blood pressure numbers, and everyone needs to prevent high blood pressure from developing.
-Myth of symptomatic headaches
The best evidence indicates that high blood pressure does not cause headaches except perhaps in the case of hypertensive crisis (systolic/top number higher than 180 OR diastolic/bottom number higher than 110).
In the early 1900s, it was assumed that headaches were more common among people with high blood pressure. However, research into the subject doesn’t support this view. According to one study, people with high blood pressure seem to have significantly fewer headaches than the general population. Headaches or the lack of headaches are not reliable indicators of your blood pressure. Instead, work with your doctor and know your numbers.
-Other inconclusively related symptoms
You should not try to evaluate your symptoms in an attempt to self-diagnose high blood pressure. Diagnosis should only be made by a healthcare professional. A variety of symptoms may be indirectly related to HBP but are not always caused by HBP, such as:
-Blood spots in the eyes
-Facial flushing
-Dizziness

Although it is not caused by HBP, dizziness can be a side effect of some high blood pressure medications. Nonetheless, dizziness should not be ignored, especially if you notice a sudden onset. Sudden dizziness, loss of balance or coordination and trouble walking are all warning signs of a stroke. HBP is one of the leading risk factors for stroke.






STRESS TEST RISKS

A stress test, also called an exercise stress test, is used to gather information about how well your heart works during physical activity. Because exercise makes your heart pump harder and faster than it does during most daily activities, an exercise stress test can reveal problems within your heart that might not be noticeable otherwise.
An exercise stress test usually involves walking on a treadmill or riding a stationary bike while your heart rhythm, blood pressure and breathing are monitored.
Your doctor may recommend an exercise stress test if he or she suspects you have coronary artery disease or an irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia). An exercise stress test may also be used to guide your treatment if you’ve already been diagnosed with a heart condition.
An exercise stress test is generally safe, and complications are rare. But, as with any medical procedure, it does carry a risk of complications.
Potential complications include:

-Low blood pressure. Blood pressure may drop during or immediately after exercise and cause dizziness. It usually goes away when you stop exercising.
-Abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias). Arrhythmias brought on by an exercise stress test usually go away shortly after you stop exercising.
-Heart attack (myocardial infarction). Although very rare, it’s possible that an exercise stress test could provoke a heart attack.






What is Multiple Sclerosis?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially debilitating disease in which your body’s immune system eats away at the protective sheath (myelin) that covers your nerves. Damage to myelin causes interference in the communication between your brain, spinal cord and other areas of your body. This condition may result in deterioration of the nerves themselves, a process that’s not reversible.
Multiple sclerosis has no cure. However, treatments may help treat MS attacks, manage symptoms and reduce progress of the disease.
Symptoms of multiple sclerosis vary, depending on the location of affected nerve fibers. Multiple sclerosis symptoms may include:
-Numbness or weakness in one or more limbs
-Partial or complete loss of central vision, usually in one eye, often with pain during eye movement (optic neuritis)
-Double vision or blurring of vision
-Tingling or pain in parts of your body
-Electric-shock sensations that occur with certain head movements
-Tremor, lack of coordination or unsteady gait
-Slurred speech
-Fatigue
-Dizziness
Heat sensitivity is common in people with multiple sclerosis. Small increases in body temperature can trigger or worsen multiple sclerosis symptoms.
Some people have a benign form of multiple sclerosis. In this form of the disease, the condition remains stable and often doesn’t progress to serious forms of MS after the initial attack.
Video: Autonomic Nervous System






How a Stress Test Will Feel

Stress testing provides information about how your heart works during physical stress. Some heart problems are easier to diagnose when your heart is working hard and beating fast. Electrodes (conductive patches) will be placed on your chest to record the heart’s activity. The preparation of the electrode sites on your chest may produce a mild burning or stinging sensation.
The blood pressure cuff on your arm will be inflated every few minutes, producing a squeezing sensation that may feel tight. Baseline measurements of heart rate and blood pressure will be taken before exercise starts.
You will start walking on a treadmill or pedaling a stationary bicycle. The pace and incline of the treadmill (or the pedaling resistance) will slowly be increased.
Sometimes, people experience some of the following during the test:
-Chest discomfort
-Dizziness
-Palpitations
-Shortness of breath






VRT test for DIZZY FREE Life

For many patients, Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT) offers new hope for living a safe and dizzy free life. VRT is a proven, personalized approach that is frequently more effective in resolving vestibular symptoms than other options, such as:

General exercises—VRT is often more effective than non-targeted PT (physical therapy) or OT (occupational therapy) exercises because it targets and treats specific problematic areas within the visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems

Medications—medicines
may temporarily relieve discomfort by suppressing the vestibular system, but alone, they fail to address underlying physiological causes. For many VRT is better than medications alone.

Settling for only partial relief—many times after their dizziness subsides, patients convince themselves that they feel “a little better” and stop seeking a long-term solution. This makes them even more vulnerable to future episodes and to harmful or potentially fatal falls.

Doing nothing—With time
, your dizziness may subside on its own. But that doesn’t mean your condition is gone. If the cause is viral, symptoms will recur each time the virus is activated. We strongly recommend this test but before that, always consult your Physician.

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