Angioplasty and Stent Implantation

Angioplasty is a widely used procedure that is performed for patients with cardiovascular disease. The procedure involves inserting a medical device, such as a balloon, into your heart to open the heart artery narrowed by plaque. It may involve placement of a stent (mesh tube) to help keep the vessel open. The stent may be coated with medicine.
Heart disease treated with angioplasty usually provides rapid relief of symptoms such as chest pain and/or shortness of breath. The majority of patients return to regular life activities without chest pain in a short time.
Angioplasty is used to:
-Restore blood flow to the affected area of the heart by treating narrowed coronary arteries
-Provide prompt relief of chest pain and/or shortness of breath after procedure
-Potentially reduce the risk of heart attack and prolong life compared to no treatment
Coronary Stents
Stents are tiny, expandable tubes made of metal mesh designed to open a blood vessel that is blocked by plaque. The angioplasty procedure opens the artery, and stents are placed and expanded to fit the size, shape and bend of the artery. The stent remains in the artery after the procedure to help keep the artery open. Over time, the artery wall heals around the stent.
There are two kinds of coronary artery stents.
-Bare-metal stents help keep the cleared artery open after angioplasty by supporting the artery wall after angioplasty. Bare-metal stents help to prevent the artery from re-narrowing.
-Photo of TAXUS Express Drug-Eluting StentDrug-coated stents are bare-metal stents with a special drug coating. These stents are also called drug-eluting stents, or DES. DES have the same support benefits as a bare-metal stent for keeping the artery open after angioplasty. In addition, the stent releases a drug over time to further reduce the chance of re-blockage.
Arteries commonly become blocked again about 7% of the time with drug-coated stents, compared to 25% for bare-metal stents.¹






What is Carotid Angioplasty?

Carotid angioplasty is a procedure that opens clogged arteries to prevent or treat stroke. The carotid arteries are located on each side of your neck and are the main arteries supplying blood to your brain. The procedure involves temporarily inserting and inflating a tiny balloon where your carotid artery is clogged to widen the artery
Carotid angioplasty and stenting may be an appropriate stroke treatment or stroke prevention option if:
-You have a history of heart problems, such as congestive heart failure, unstable angina or a failed stress test
-You have a carotid artery with a 70 percent blockage or more, especially if you’ve had a stroke or stroke symptoms, and you aren’t in good enough health to undergo surgery — for example, if you have severe heart or lung disease or had radiation for neck tumors
-You’ve already had a carotid endarterectomy and are experiencing new narrowing after surgery (restenosis)
-The location of the narrowing (stenosis) is difficult to access with endarterectomy
In some cases, traditional carotid surgery (carotid endarterectomy) may be advised to remove the buildup of plaques (fatty material) that is narrowing the artery.